Tag: Surgical outcomes

Study: Thrombectomy beneficial in high-risk acute stroke patients with large infarct

Editor's Note Building on previous evidence favoring thrombectomy even in high-risk cases, the prospective randomized LASTE trial finds the surgical procedure could reduce mortality and improve funcational outcomes in patients with acute stroke and large infarct of unrestricted size. Medpage Today reported the news May 8. Originally published in the…

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By: Matt Danford
May 16, 2024
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Study: Surgical team diversity improves patient outcomes

Editor's Note The more diverse the surgical team, the better the outcomes for patients and the lower the cost of care, according to a study of more than 700,000 operations at 88 hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Published May 15 in the British Journal of Surgery, findings show that surgeon-anesthetist teams…

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By: Matt Danford
May 15, 2024
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Robotic-assisted total knee replacements: Improved outcomes, higher costs

Editor's Note A new study from UT Southwestern Medical Center shows that total knee replacements performed with the aid of surgical robots generally yield better outcomes compared to traditional manual procedures, but at a higher cost, UT Southwestern’s Newsroom May 7 reports. Published in the Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma…

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By: Tarsilla Moura
May 8, 2024
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Neurosurgery trial: Early evacuation improves long-term hemorrhage outcomes

Editor's Note Medical management care with evacuation surgery could yield better 180-day outcomes than without in patents treated within 24 hours for acute intracerebral hemorrhage, according to study results covered in an April 10 MedPage Today report. The ENRICH (Early MiNimally-invasive Removal of IntraCerebral Hemorrhage (ICH)) trial is a multicenter,…

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By: Matt Danford
April 18, 2024
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Urologists advocate for resources to help surgeons prepare for, cope with adverse events

Editor's Note Adverse events are a ubiquitous, inevitable consequence of surgical practice, and more must be done to support surgeons before and after they occur. This is the central message of a video published March 27 by Urology Times, in which British urologist Kevin Turner, MA DM FRCS, of Royal…

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By: Matt Danford
April 8, 2024
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Laparoscopic cholecystectomy could benefit patients with normal ejection fraction

Editor's Note Patients with biliary symptoms can benefit from laparoscopic cholecystectomy even with a normal ejection fraction (greater than 35%), according to a study published November 30 in the American Journal of Surgery. Although previous data have shown the surgery to improve biliary symptoms (such as abdominal pain) in patients…

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By: Matt Danford
April 3, 2024
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Swifty’s singing keeps brain surgery on track

Editor's Note Staying awake during brain surgery to sing Taylor Swift songs helped ensure the best possible outcome for Selena Campione, a 36-year-old teacher from Stanhope, New Jersey who recently had a tumor removed at Jersey Shore University Medical Center. As detailed in a March 21 report from People, neurooncologist…

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By: Matt Danford
March 22, 2024
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Lack of primary care physicians tied to emergency surgeries

Editor's Note Research shows that Americans who live in areas with a limited number of primary care doctors and nurse practitioners are at a greater risk for emergency surgeries and complications. The findings were published March 4 in the journal Health Affairs.  For the study, researchers looked at Medicare patient…

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By: Brita Belli
March 19, 2024
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Physician shortages boost likelihood of emergency surgery, complications

Editor's Note Health complications and hospital readmissions are more likely for Medicare patients living in areas with primary care shortages. The findings, from a cross-sectional retrospective cohort study of data from 2015 to 2019, were published March 4 in Health Affairs. Specifically, the study showed that patients in areas with…

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By: Matt Danford
March 12, 2024
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Flexible sticker device detects postoperative gastrointestinal leaks

Editor's Note A medical device developed by researchers at Northwestern University and Washington University School of Medicine could enable clinicians to monitor the health of a patient’s organs following surgery. The findings appeared in the journal Science on March 7.  Patients who undergo gastrointestinal surgeries—including pancreatic surgery—can develop anastomotic leaks…

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By: Brita Belli
March 8, 2024
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