Tag: Patient Satisfaction

Federal regulations require written consent for pelvic exams at hospitals, medical schools

Editor's Note New federal guidelines require obtaining written informed consent before conducting pelvic and other sensitive medical examinations, according to an April 2 Associated Press report. The new guidance from the US Department of Health and Human Services focuses specifically on medical students, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants performing breast,…

Read More

By: Matt Danford
April 15, 2024
Share

Healthcare safety report: Outcomes improving, but workplace violence persists

Editor's Note Healthcare safety is moving in the right direction generally, but low perceptions of safety and rising reports of violence against nurses represent critical gaps that leaders should address, according to an April 2 press release on Press Ganey’s “Safety in Healthcare 2024” report. Focused on event reporting, workforce…

Read More

By: Matt Danford
April 12, 2024
Share

Anesthesiologists push to improve pain control during caesarean delivery

Editor's Note A letter to the editor published April 10 in Anesthesiology, the official publication of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), calls attention to an official statement outlining best practices for ensuring all moms-to-be receive adequate pain management during planned or unexpected C-sections. The best practices are outlined in…

Read More

By: Matt Danford
April 10, 2024
Share

Patient survey: Excessive needlesticks during hospital visits impede workflow

Editor's Note A new survey finds that hospital patients receive more needlesticks than necessary, negatively impacting their experience and contributing to workflow issues. The survey was published March 27 by medical technology company BD and conducted by the Harris Poll. More than 1 in 10 (11%) of 2,006 surveyed adults, including…

Read More

By: Brita Belli
April 8, 2024
Share

Private payers profit by delaying medical claims

Editor's Note Private payers initially deny reimbursement on 15% of claims, only to later approve more than half of those initial denials, according to a national survey of healthcare institutions published March 21 by Premiere, Inc. Additionally, the denied claims on average tend to be more prevalent for higher-cost treatments…

Read More

By: Matt Danford
April 4, 2024
Share

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy could benefit patients with normal ejection fraction

Editor's Note Patients with biliary symptoms can benefit from laparoscopic cholecystectomy even with a normal ejection fraction (greater than 35%), according to a study published November 30 in the American Journal of Surgery. Although previous data have shown the surgery to improve biliary symptoms (such as abdominal pain) in patients…

Read More

By: Matt Danford
April 3, 2024
Share

New hope for Black kidney disease patients awaiting organ transplants

Editor's Note A standard kidney function test has been underestimating the seriousness of disease in Black patients, delaying their eligibility for transplants, The Associated Press reported March 31. Now, that test is changing – and Black patients awaiting kidneys are moving up the list.  Among other factors, transplant eligibility is…

Read More

By: Brita Belli
April 1, 2024
Share

Donor hearts denied more often to male, black male transplant candidates

Editor's Note New research shows transplant center teams are more to likely reject offers of donor hearts to black men and men than black women and white women, MedPage Today reported on March 25. “The cumulative probability of a donor heart being accepted by the transplant center team was most…

Read More

By: Matt Danford
March 28, 2024
Share

Study: Postoperative hospital readmissions higher for older Americans

JAMA (healthcare publication) Network logo

Editor's Note Older Americans are at heightened risk for both short-term and long-term hospital readmission following major surgery, according to a study from Yale University published February 28 in Jama Network Open.   Readmission places a major financial strain on health systems, researchers write, pointing out that the total cost…

Read More

By: Brita Belli
March 27, 2024
Share

Study: Propofol sedation increases colonoscopy costs without improving outcomes

Editor's Note Although the use of propofol for colonoscopy has been rising due to beliefs that deep sedation leads to greater patient comfort, a recent systematic review and meta-analysis of nearly 1,500 patients form nine randomized controlled trials shows this view is not supported by available evidence. Published March 8…

Read More

By: Matt Danford
March 25, 2024
Share

Join our community

Learn More
Video Spotlight
Live chat by BoldChat