Tag: Infection Prevention

Preventing S aureus infections: What's needed for screening?

A new study in the New England Journal of Medicine finds that treating patients who are Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriers with mupirocin nasal ointment and chlorhexidine gluconate soap for 5 days reduces hospital-associated postoperative S aureus infection by 60%. "This well-designed, well-executed study contributes more to our knowledge that screening…

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By: Cynthia Saver, RN, MS
March 1, 2010
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SSI prevention: How's your practice?

Preventing surgical infections is what perioperative nursing is all about. From the moment they don a scrub suit and cap, they engage in well-practiced steps to protect patients from harmful micro-organisms. Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a well-known cause of suffering and death. An estimated 500,000 SSIs occur each year.…

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By: Pat Patterson
March 1, 2010
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AAAHC adds infection control chapter to standards handbook

Ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) accredited by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) can expect noteworthy changes in the 2010 accreditation handbook to be published in February 2010. For the first time in 30 years, a new core chapter is being added, focusing on infection control and safety. The…

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By: OR Manager
February 1, 2010
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Tackling an outbreak of MRSA SSIs

In late 2007 and early 2008, an Arizona hospital saw an alarming increase in surgical site infections (SSI) with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). For the first quarter in 2008, the infection rate for total hip replacements and revisions averaged 3.73%, well above the national average of 1.6%, with most involving…

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By: Pat Patterson
November 1, 2009
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National study probes ties between 'best practices,' surgical infection

What distinguishes hospitals with low levels of surgical infection? What characteristics and practices make a difference? In an effort to identify best practices nationally, the American College of Surgeons (ACS) has reported new research using its rigorous methodology for studying surgical outcomes. Among the major findings, hospitals with a lower…

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By: Pat Patterson
February 1, 2009
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A perspective on OR laminar air flow

This perspective elaborates on recent study findings published in the November 2008 Annals of Surgery, which conclude there may be little benefit from vertical laminar air flow (LAF) for preventing surgical site infections (SSIs) in orthopedic and general surgical procedures. The investigation by Christian Brandt, MD, and colleagues from Germany…

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By: OR Manager
February 1, 2009
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HHS launches action plan to prevent HAIs

The US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has launched an action plan with 5-year targets for preventing health care-associated infections (HAIs). The plan was developed by an HHS steering committee involving a number of federal agencies. "This plan will serve as our roadmap on how the department addresses…

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By: OR Manager
February 1, 2009
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New infection requirements in 2009 Patient Safety Goals

Organizations that haven't already adopted evidence-based practices to prevent infections will need to do so to meet Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goals in 2009. For surgery, that includes appropriate administration of antibiotics and eliminating preoperative shaving. As part of the 2009 goals announced June 17, facilities will have to…

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By: OR Manager
August 1, 2008
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Updated infection control guidelines

Revised infection control guidelines for GI endoscopy have been issued by the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates (SGNA) and the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE). Both SGNA and ASGE point out that failure to adhere to established reprocessing guidelines accounts for most if not all of reported cases…

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By: OR Manager
August 1, 2008
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Mediastinitis: Targeting zero infections

A new push is on to reduce hospital-acquired infections—the target is zero. As of Oct 1, 2008, Medicare will not pay hospitals for additional costs associated with 3 types of infections deemed preventable: catheter-associated urinary tract infections central line catheter-associated bloodstream infections mediastinitis—a deep sternal incisional infection following coronary artery…

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By: OR Manager
June 1, 2008
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