Skin Preparation

Latest Issue of OR Manager
April 2021

Study: OR fires linked to alcohol-based skin preps

Editor's Note In this experimental study, alcohol-based skin preps fueled OR fires in common clinical scenarios. No fires occurred with nonalcohol-based preps; however, alcohol-based preps caused flash flames at 0 minutes in 22% and at 3 minutes in 10% of tests. Pooling of alcohol-based preps caused fires in 38% at…

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By: Judy Mathias
February 14, 2017
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FDA warns of allergic reactions to CHG

Editor's Note The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on February 2 issued a warning that rare but serious allergic reactions have been reported with use of chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG). The FDA is requesting that manufacturers add a warning label about this risk to over-the-counter (OTC) products containing CHG. CHG is…

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By: Judy Mathias
February 6, 2017
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SSIs fall sharply with team-based protocol changes

Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a major cause of morbidity in surgical patients, leading to increased length of stay and healthcare costs. No single intervention has demonstrated efficacy in reducing SSIs. When SSIs rose to a rate of 16.3% in 2013 at St Elizabeth Boardman Hospital in Boardman, Ohio, perioperative…

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By: OR Manager
December 14, 2016
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Chlorhexidine better than triclosan for skin prep

Editor's Note Chlorhexidine is the best antiseptic for skin prep when a prolonged effect is needed, such as when implanting medical devices or performing surgical procedures, this study finds. Of 135 healthy volunteers tested, at 24 hours: unscrubbed control bacterial counts were 288 CFU/cm2 scrubbed control counts were 96 CFU/cm2…

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By: Judy Mathias
November 30, 2016
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CDC updates guidelines on CHG dressings

Editor's Note The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is accepting comments on the draft update to its recommendations for the use of chlorhexidine (CHG)-impregnated dressings to prevent intravascular catheter-related infections. The draft addresses new and updated strategies and is based on a review of the evidence since 2010…

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By: Judy Mathias
November 29, 2016
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Chlorhexidine better than iodine to prevent SSIs after C-sections

Editor's Note The use of chlorhexidine and alcohol for preoperative skin preparation resulted in a significantly lower risk of surgical site infections (SSIs)  after cesarean deliveries than iodine and alcohol in this study. Those who had the chlorhexidine prep had a 4% infection rate, which is nearly half that of…

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By: Judy Mathias
February 5, 2016
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Standardized approach for preop chlorhexidine showers reduces SSIs

Editor's Note A standardized process of dose, duration, and timing for preoperative showers with 4% chlorhexidine gluconate maximizes the benefit of the shower as an effective risk reduction strategy for surgical site infections, finds this study. The process includes: 118 mL of aqueous 4% chlorhexidine gluconate per shower a minimum…

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By: OR Manager
September 2, 2015
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Quandary: What to do for vaginal prep

It's a question ORs have faced for several years—what do you use for the vaginal prep when the patient is allergic to povidone iodine? After Techni-Care (PCMX, or chloroxylenol) stopped being made in 2009, clinicians were left without a skin prep indicated for use in the genital area for iodineallergic…

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By: Pat Patterson
August 1, 2011
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Will skin-prep practice change following new study results?

Strong evidence from a new 6-hospital study could lead many ORs to change their traditional practice for surgical skin preparation. In the first prospective, randomized study to compare the effect of 2 skin prep agents on the incidence of surgical site infections (SSIs) after clean-contami-nated surgery, a chlorhexidine (CHG)-alcohol product…

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By: OR Manager
April 1, 2010
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Save Our Skin: Periop teams rally to prevent pressure ulcers in OR

A new Medicare payment policy is spurring hospitals to strengthen their programs to prevent pressure ulcers and other avoidable complications. Starting in October 2008, Medicare will no longer pay extra for treatment of 8 preventable conditions acquired in the hospital, including pressure ulcers. Pressure ulcers not only interfere with recovery,…

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By: OR Manager
March 1, 2008
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