Home Issues OR Manager [November, 2010]

The price is right for cost awareness

Which is more expensive—a robotic handle or a shunt valve? How much does hemostatic matrix cost? Thanks to an innovative game modeled after "The Price is Right," staff at the University of New Mexico Hospital (UNM), Albuquerque, know the answers: The shunt valve is more expensive than the robotic handle…

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By: Cynthia Saver, RN, MS
November 1, 2010
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Business manager salaries top $78,000

Just over one-third (34%) of respondents to the OR Manager Salary/Career survey say they have an OR business manager. That's slightly lower than the 38% in 2008 but a substantial gain over the 23% in 2005. What are the OR business manager's responsibilities? (n = 99) Financial analysis/reporting 86% Value…

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By: OR Manager
November 1, 2010
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Onboarding: Laying the foundation

Third in a series on selecting and hiring perioperative nurses and integrating them into the staff. So far, this series has taken us from developing selection criteria to making a job offer. In the September and October 2010 issues, we looked at the first 9 steps for identifying suitable participants…

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By: OR Manager
November 1, 2010
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Nursing M & M conference: Help in healing from a serious event

Your OR has had an adverse event. A debriefing has been held with those involved, and a root cause analysis has been performed. Systems issues have been identified, and process improvements are underway. But how do you get the word out to other nurses and physicians that the same kind…

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By: OR Manager
November 1, 2010
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OR managers gather in Orlando

Walt Disney World in Orlando provided the stage for the 23rd Annual Managing Today's OR Suite conference September 29 to October 1, 2010. OR Manager of the Year Lorna Eberle RN, BSN, CNOR, is congratulated by Mickey. The 632 attendees listened to informative, inspiring programs packed with ideas to apply…

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By: Cynthia Saver, RN, MS
November 1, 2010
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Vitamin D often low in orthopedic patients

Some 40% of patients scheduled for orthopedic surgery have low levels of vitamin D that may negatively affect outcomes, a new study finds. Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium and is essential for optimal bone health and muscle function. Researchers from New York City's Hospital for Special Surgery retrospectively…

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By: OR Manager
November 1, 2010
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Initiative: Greater role for nursing

Nurses need to be able to practice to the full extent of their skill and education to meet the nation's health care needs, a national panel announced. Results of the 2-year Initiative on the Future of Nursing by the Institute of Medicine and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation were rolled…

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By: OR Manager
November 1, 2010
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Predicting frailty risk in older patients

About half of all surgery in the US is performed on patients over 65. These older patients have been found to be at increased risk for post-operative complications. Complications often lead to disability loss of independence, poorer quality of life, high costs, and mortality. Though many patients over 65 do…

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By: OR Manager
November 1, 2010
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Help in evaluating bone allografts

Second in a series on managing bone allografts. Bone-graft substitutes in all of their many forms have one purpose—to replicate the "gold standard" for bone repair and healing—the patient's own bone. Though a patient's own tissue—an autograft—is the ideal replacement for injured or diseased bone, an autograft may not be…

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By: Heather Brannen, PhD
November 1, 2010
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Making good choices of DBM products

With their array of gels, pastes, and putties, demineralized bone matrix (DBM) products are a confusing area. What questions can your OR team ask to help make good product choices? OR Manager talked with experts who outlined issues to consider. Suggested questions to ask companies are in the sidebar on…

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By: Pat Patterson
November 1, 2010
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Bone allografts: Understanding their roles in the healing process

Bone-graft substitutes are one of the most challenging types of materials OR teams must consider. They include grafts made from human tissues, animals, synthetics, and combinations. They all attempt to replicate the "gold standard" for bone repair, the patient's own tissue. This issue continues our series on bone-graft substitutes in…

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By: OR Manager
November 1, 2010
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Bone allografts: Options for healing

These are examples of types of bone allograft products and purposes they serve. With the chart on page 12, this information can help OR teams determine where a new allograft product would fit into current inventory. Allograft cancellous chips Cancellous chips, a common nonstructural human allograft bone material, serve as…

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By: OR Manager
November 1, 2010
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Steps to preventing DVT for outpatients

It's a common scenario. A patient has a minor orthopedic procedure, such as a hammertoe repair, and receives a cast. The patient is immobilized at home and ends up with deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Venous thromboembolism (VTE), a frequent complication of surgery that manifests as DVT or pulmonary embolism (PE),…

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By: Judith M. Mathias, RN, MA
November 1, 2010
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